Public Programs Archive

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View our archive of past public programs.

Matrix code: 
04.03.01.01
Noguchi Talks | Robert Stadler and Dakin Hart: Solid Doubts
Sunday, May 7, 2017 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm

Join Robert Stadler and the Noguchi Museum’s Senior Curator, Dakin Hart, on a walkthrough of the exhibition Solid Doubts: Robert Stadler at The Noguchi Museum, to investigate and expose the conventional boundaries between art and design. Free with Museum admission; advance registration is not required.

 

Like Noguchi, Paris-based, Austrian designer Robert Stadler (b. 1966) is a category-defying artist whose work comes from a place where conceptual, aesthetic, functional, and material considerations meet. Solid Doubts presents Noguchi’s and Stadler's work together in four distinct installations to raise questions about the categorization of functional objects.

 

Image: Isamu Noguchi, Mirror and Clothes Rack for Martha Graham’s ‘Hérodiade’, 1944, and Akari [30A], 1954; with Robert Stadler, PDT (bench, mirror and table), 2015, and Anywhere #2, 2017. Photo: Nicholas Knight/©The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum / Artists Rights Society (ARS).

Film Screening at Museum of the Moving Image: For the Sake of the Children
Sunday, May 7, 2017 - 2:00pm - 3:30pm

The Museum of the Moving Image
Redstone Theater
36-01 35th Avenue (at 37th Street)
Astoria, NY 11106

 

Dirs. Joe Fox, Marlene Shigekawa. 2017, 65 mins. Digital projection. More details and buy tickets at MovingImage.us.

 

Marking the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, the wartime directive that authorized the internment of Japanese citizens and American citizens of Japanese heritage, Museum of the Moving Image and The Noguchi Museum present For the Sake of the Children. This documentary, co-directed and -produced by Joe Fox and Marlene Shigekawa, explores the legacy of the Japanese American incarceration, including its impact—informed by a complex interplay of culture, racial prejudice, history, and intergenerational differences—on current generations, who are descendants of those imprisoned.

 

For the Sake of the Children follows the journeys of a variety of Japanese Americans from different generations who are searching for their identity as Americans with a unique Japanese American heritage. The individuals profiled in this film include artists, politicians, preservationists, journalists, activists, and young students. Many of their stories have never been told.

 

For the Sake of the Children is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Self-Interned, 1942: Noguchi in Poston War Relocation Center, on view at The Noguchi Museum through January 7, 2018.

 

The post-film discussion with the filmmakers will be moderated by Shannon Murphy, Head of Education at The Noguchi Museum.

 

Free tickets to the screening are included with admission to The Museum of the Moving Image. Attendees will receive a free pass to visit The Noguchi Museum after the screening. Noguchi Museum Members receive a 20% discount with promotional code. Check for the invitation in your inbox, or contact [email protected] to reclaim.

 

BUY TICKETS

 

 

Photo: Sean Dolan. The exhibition Self-Interned, 1942: Noguchi in Poston War Relocation Center and its related public and educational programs are supported by the Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation.

Free First Friday - Extended Summer Hours
Friday, May 5, 2017 - 10:00am - 8:00pm

On the first Friday of every month year-round, the Museum offers visitors free admission and tours in English and Japanese at 2 pm.

 

Extended Summer First Friday hours begin this month and continue through September, with a cash bar and drinks in the garden in the evening. (Refreshments are free for Museum members.)

 

Photo: Taylor Brown.

Free First Friday
Friday, April 7, 2017 - 10:00am - 5:00pm

On the first Friday of every month year-round, the Museum offers visitors free admission, with tours in English and Japanese at 2 pm.

 

Photo: Elizabeth Felicella.

Poems About Sculpture
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 - 7:00pm - 8:00pm

Join us to celebrate Poems About Sculpture (Knopf, 2016) with the anthology's editor, sculptor Murray Dewart; Robert Pinsky, former four-time U.S. Poet Laureate and founder of the Favorite Poem Project, who penned the foreword to the book; and poet Rachel Hadas. Co-hosted by PSA's Executive Director Alice Quinn and board president Kimiko Hahn. Reception to follow.

 

Admission is free; RSVP not required. Co-sponsored by The Noguchi Museum and The Poetry Society of America.

 

Read more about the publication here.

Noguchi Talks | Matt Kirsch: Noguchi in Poston War Relocation Center
Sunday, March 19, 2017 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm

Matt Kirsch, the Museum’s Curator of Research, will lead a tour of Self-Interned, 1942: Noguchi in Poston War Relocation Center. Free with Museum admission; advance registration is not required.

 

Self-Interned, 1942 marks the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, the notorious wartime directive that authorized the incarceration of Japanese citizens and American citizens of Japanese heritage living on the west coast. The exhibition examines Isamu Noguchi’s extraordinary decision to voluntarily enter the Poston War Relocation Center in the Arizona desert, despite being exempt from internment as a resident of New York.

 

Photo: Nicholas Knight.

Free First Friday
Friday, March 3, 2017 - 10:00am - 5:00pm

On the first Friday of every month year-round, the Museum offers visitors free admission, with tours in English and Japanese at 2 pm.

 

Photo: Elizabeth Felicella.

Artists at Noguchi | Kimi Maeda, ‘Bend’
Sunday, February 19, 2017 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm

As part of a special Community Day marking the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, The Noguchi Museum is pleased to welcome artist Kimi Maeda, who will present her solo performance, Bend, to accompany the exhibition Self-Interned, 1942: Noguchi in Poston War Relocation Center.

 

The performance tells the true story of two men interned in a Japanese American internment camp during World War II: Maeda’s father Robert Maeda, an Asian Art historian who suffered from dementia at the end of his life, and the subject of his research, Isamu Noguchi. Weaving together live feed projections of sand drawings with archival footage from the 1940s, Maeda’s performance poses important questions about how the Japanese American internment camps will be remembered. More about Maeda’s performance here.

 

Admission to the Museum is free all day on February 19, and includes admission to the 2 pm Public Tour, and 3 pm performance of Bend.

 

During the course of the exhibition, Maeda will also lead Art for Families and Open Studio programs to engage families with Noguchi’s story:

 

Art for Families (advance registration is required)

Sunday, February 19: Storytelling: Drawing in Sand

Saturday, February 25: Storytelling: Drawing in Sand

 

Open Studio (drop in program, no advance registration required)

Sunday, March 5: Sand Drawing

 

Photo: Kirk Murphy.

Community Day - Day of Remembrance
Sunday, February 19, 2017 - 10:30am - 6:00pm

The Museum offers free admission all day and special programming in remembrance of the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, which authorized the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II; and coinciding with the exhibition Self-Interned, 1942: Noguchi in Poston War Relocation Center.

 

Events:
10:30 am–12:30 pm: Art For Families, Storytelling: Drawing in Sand (registration/waitlist here)
2 pm: Public Tour of the Museum
3 pm: Artist Kimi Maeda performs Bend (details here)

 

Photo: Kirk Murphy.

The Rhythm Method String Quartet featuring Alice Teyssier | The Once and Future Maiden at The Noguchi Museum
Sunday, February 5, 2017 - 3:00pm - 4:00pm

In celebration of the exhibition of Noguchi’s two sculptures Birth (1934) and Death (1934) together in the same gallery for the first time, The Noguchi Museum presents The Rhythm Method String Quartet featuring Alice Teyssier in a program entitled The Once and Future Maiden. In the same way that Noguchi sought a lifelong balance between figuration and abstraction, the various compositional voices on this program deal with fragmented portraits of women in life and death.

 

Dai Fujikura’s silence seeking solace is at times whimsical and ecstatic and in the next instant desolate and cold, as the soprano weaves through the string quartet in whispers and virtuosic vocal leaps. Fujikura’s Deconstructing Franz is a response to the classic Schubert work, Death and the Maiden, bringing the idea of engaging in the history of art and curation to the concert. Leah Asher, known for her beautiful graphic scores, blends the alto flute and viola in delicate breaths and percussive edges in her new work If We Should Meet, Here. Asher’s work was written specifically for the performers on this concert, and developed through close collaboration. Finally, Anne Lanzilotti writes a new work for the occasion using two of Noguchi’s obsidian sound sculptures. It is the personal relationships between composers and performers that allows for interpretations which are extreme in their delicacy and physicality, and expose the intimacy and suffering in these works.

 

This program is free with Museum admission.

 

Image: Composer Dai Fujikura.