Our site uses cookies for a better experience. Privacy Policy

8 Gabriel Orozco Rotating Objects The Noguchi Museum Roto Shaku 14 Photo By Nicholas Knight

Gabriel Orozco: Rotating Objects

April 17, 2019 – August 11, 2019

This installation of ten works by Gabriel Orozco (b. 1962), seven Roto Shaku and three Obi Scrolls, complements Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan (opening May 1). Created in Tokyo in 2015, Orozco’s works provide a contemporary parallel to Isamu Noguchi and Saburo Hasegawa’s efforts to create modern art that developed Japan’s traditional craft cultures.

The Roto Shaku are made from a standard length of lumber that the artist has wrapped in a range of colored tapes. Employing his signature geometries, Orozco establishes a counterpoint between multiple traditions of abstraction and seeming abstraction: decorative patterning, practical mark making (as for measurement), and the theories of signs, symbols, and structures that underlie much of modern Western painting. Orozco’s Obi Scrolls were fashioned by incising, rotating, and reversing sections of fragments of antique kimono sashes (obi). The results were then mounted on scrolls as paintings, converting conventions of wrapping into explicit content.

Gabriel Orozco: Rotating Objects is supported, in part, with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council and from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Your browser is out-of-date

Our website has detected that you are using a browser that will prevent you from accessing certain features. An upgrade is recommended.

Update my browser now

×