Past Exhibitions

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View photographs and learn more about past exhibitions at The Noguchi Museum and other institutions around the world.

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04.01.03
Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan
Saturday, January 12, 2019 - Sunday, March 24, 2019

Yokohama Museum of Art, Japan

Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan focuses on the consequential friendship between Isamu Noguchi (1904–1988) and Saburo Hasegawa (1906–1957). Until his early death, Hasegawa was among the most renowned contemporary Japanese artists in the U.S., credited with introducing European abstraction to Japan in his role as an active art historian, critic, and art theorist.

The brief yet productive relationship between the two artists was kindled during Noguchi’s visit to Japan in 1950, as together they sought to understand and process the fragmented postwar world and art’s potential role in reassembling it. Noguchi and Hasegawa were each thinking deeply about the relationship between tradition and modernity and between indigenous and foreign influences in postwar art and culture in Japan and in their own work. Together, they undertook a wide-ranging study of traditional Japanese design, culture, and aesthetics. Comprising about 90 works by both Noguchi and Hasegawa, the exhibition will trace influences of their dialogue in their contemporary and subsequent work.

Organized by The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, New York, Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan is curated by Dakin Hart, Senior Curator at The Noguchi Museum, and Mark Dean Johnson, Professor and Gallery Director at San Francisco State University. The exhibition will be on view at the Yokohama Museum of Art, in Japan, from January 12 to March 24, 2019; The Noguchi Museum from May 1 to July 14, 2019; and the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco from September 27 to December 8, 2019.

Read more at yokohama.art.museum.


Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan is made possible through lead support from the Terra Foundation for American Art. Generous transportation assistance has been provided by ANA (All Nippon Airways Co., Ltd.). Major support has also been received from the National Endowment for the Arts and from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation. The exhibition is also supported, in part, with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council and from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

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Dimensionism: Modern Art in the Age of Einstein
Wednesday, November 7, 2018 - Sunday, March 3, 2019

Berkeley Art Museum, University of California

In the early twentieth century, inspired by modern science such as Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity, an emerging avant-garde movement sought to expand the “dimensionality” of modern art, engaging with theoretical concepts of time and space to advance bold new forms of creative expression. Dimensionism: Modern Art in the Age of Einstein illuminates the remarkable connections between the scientific and artistic revolutions that shaped some of the most significant works of the time, from Alexander Calder’s kinetic sculptures to Marcel Duchamp’s early experiments with Conceptual art. Others were inspired by emerging research into interstellar and microscopic spaces, while expanding knowledge of quantum mechanics transformed many artists’ views of the world, leading to new approaches to understanding the nature of everyday reality.

Read more at bampfa.org.

Isamu Noguchi, Yellow Landscape, 1943 (partially reconstructed, 1995). Magnesite, wood, string, metal. Photo: Kevin Noble. ©The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, NY / ARS.

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Jorge Palacios at The Noguchi Museum
Wednesday, September 26, 2018 - Sunday, January 20, 2019

Nine sculptures by Jorge Palacios (b. 1979, Spain) explore the laws of physics and motion on microscopic and macroscopic levels. Integrated into the Museum’s permanent installation, Palacios’s works bring renewed attention to Noguchi’s frequent experiments with the physical sciences, as well as with turning art-viewing into a physical experience.

Complementing the exhibition, Palacios’s monumental accoya wood sculpture Link (2018) will be installed at Flatiron Plaza North in Manhattan, August 16–November 6, 2018. Read more


Exhibition Catalogue

The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated catalogue featuring full color installation photography by Miguel de Guzmán, an essay by exhibition curator Dakin Hart, and a conversation between the artist and architect Ana Maria Torres. Available in the Museum Shop.


About Jorge Palacios

Jorge Palacios’s sculptures have been widely shown in public spaces, includ­ing in SoHo, New York City, where he exhibited Sketch in the Air (2015); in front of the Monastery of San Lorenzo de El Escorial, Madrid; in the “Torres de Colón,” in Madrid, and, as part of an exhibition of his urban sculptures in the streets of Toledo, at that city’s Floridablanca Sculpture Gardens, Sun Gate, Bisagra Gate, and Santa Cruz Art Museum. His work has also been exhibited in numerous museums, including the Santa Cruz Art Museum, Museum of Fine Arts of Guadalajara, and the Mirador Hall of the Thyssen-Bornemisza, in Madrid, and it may be found in public and private collections in Canada, Switzerland, Spain, and the United States. Palacios divides his time between his studio in New York City and his workshop in Spain. jorgepalacios.us


From top: Jorge Palacios, Balance and Inertia, 2011. Teak, corten steel. The Singularity of the Curve, 2017. Bamboo. Photos ©Jorge Palacios. Homepage: Okiagari-Koboshi, 2018. Accoya. Photograph by Elizabeth Felicella. Flowing Drop, 2017. Ebony. Blood Cell, 2014. Maple, slate. Photograph by ImagenSubliminal (Miguel de Guzmán + Rocío Romero). ©The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, NY / ARS and Jorge Palacios.

Jorge Palacios at The Noguchi Museum is supported by Porcelanosa and the Consulate General of Spain in New York. The exhibition is also supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council and from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. The installation of the sculpture Link is made possible thanks to the collaboration of the New York City Department of Transportation’s Art Program and the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership. Special thanks to Vivanco and Fermín for their contributions to the opening reception.

Isamu Noguchi: Inside and Out
Saturday, April 14, 2018 - Sunday, January 6, 2019

SFO Museum, San Francisco International Airport

Located in the pre-security screening area in the international terminal, this exhibition’s two installations represent interior and exterior landscapes. The objects are drawn from Noguchi's last two forays in sheet metal kirigami, combined with his Akari lanterns. The galvanized steel pieces in the exterior environment, made from the same material as guardrails and lampposts, were conceived as a series of editions to answer the great demand for outdoor sculpture by him with works that are, like Akari, relatively lightweight, inexpensive, playful, and unpretentious. In the interior environment, Akari lanterns join a related body of work in cut-and-folded bronze plate designed to winkingly play off of the perceived preciousness and self-seriousness of bronze sculpture.
—Dakin Hart, Senior Curator, The Noguchi Museum

Read more at flysfo.com.

Image, from left: Isamu Noguchi, Jack in the Box, 1984. Bronze plate. Akari UF4-L10 (1986) and UF4-L8 (c. 1985). Washi paper, bamboo, metal. Collection of the Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, NY. Photo courtesy of SFO Museum.

Beyond the Pedestal: Isamu Noguchi and the Borders of Sculpture
Friday, October 5, 2018 - Sunday, January 6, 2019

Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine

Beyond the Pedestal: Isamu Noguchi and the Borders of Sculpture investigates Noguchi’s expansive artistic practice by exploring his efforts to enlarge and challenge conventional notions of sculptural boundaries. Born in 1904, the Japanese-American modernist experimented endlessly with the intersection of objects, people, and space over the course of his 60-year career. Melding ideas and approaches to art from across the globe, Noguchi created traditional sculpture, landscape architecture, play structures, monuments, stage sets, interior designs, furniture, and more. This exhibition brings aspects of his varied production together, complicating notions of form and function and using the juxtaposition of materials, shapes, and techniques to encourage audiences to reimagine their sense of what sculpture can be.

Read more at portlandmuseum.org.

Image: Isamu Noguchi, Black and Blue (Interior Landscape), 1958–59 (fabricated 1979–80). Aluminum, electrostatic paint, and polyurathane paint. ©The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, New York / ARS.

The Life of Forms
Friday, October 26, 2018 - Friday, December 14, 2018

Di Donna Galleries, New York, NY

Di Donna Galleries presents The Life of Forms, an exhibition that explores the vitality and diversity of biomorphic sculpture among modern artists who translated forms found in nature into poetic shapes and rhythms. The exhibition will bring together important sculptures by Jean Arp, Ruth Asawa, Louise Bourgeois, Alexander Calder, Agustín Cárdenas, Barbara Hepworth, Henri Matisse, Joan Miró, Henry Moore, Isamu Noguchi, Wolfgang Paalen, and William Turnbull, installed in Di Donna’s Madison Avenue gallery in a setting that evokes a mysterious garden. The Life of Forms features works loaned by major private collections and institutions, including The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation and The Noguchi Museum.

Read more at didonna.com.

Installation view, The Life of Forms, Di Donna Galleries, 744 Madison Avenue, New York, NY. Courtesy of Di Donna Galleries.