Offsite Exhibitions

Description: 

The Noguchi Museum partners with institutions around the world to coordinate exhibitions and loans of Noguchi’s artwork from the Museum’s collection.  The following exhibitions are currently on view.  Past offsite exhibitions are listed on the Past Exhibitions page.

Matrix code: 
04.01.02
Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan
Friday, September 27, 2019 - Sunday, December 8, 2019

Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan focuses on the consequential friendship between Isamu Noguchi (1904–1988) and Saburo Hasegawa (1906–1957). Until his early death, Hasegawa was among the most renowned contemporary Japanese artists in the U.S., and credited with introducing European abstraction to Japan in his role as an active art historian, critic, and art theorist.

The brief yet productive relationship between the two artists was kindled during Noguchi’s visit to Japan in 1950, as together they sought to understand and process the fragmented postwar world and art’s potential role in reassembling it. Noguchi and Hasegawa were each thinking deeply about the relationship between tradition and modernity and between indigenous and foreign influences in postwar art and culture in Japan and in their own work. Together, they undertook a wide-ranging study of traditional Japanese design, culture, and aesthetics. Comprising about 90 works by both Noguchi and Hasegawa, the exhibition will trace influences of their dialogue in their contemporary and subsequent work.

Organized by The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, New York, Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan is curated by Dakin Hart, Senior Curator at The Noguchi Museum, and Mark Dean Johnson, Professor and Gallery Director at San Francisco State University. The exhibition will be on view at the Yokohama Museum of Art, in Japan, from January 12 to March 24, 2019; The Noguchi Museum from May 1 to July 14, 2019; and the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco from September 27 to December 8, 2019.


Screen diptych by Saburo Hasegawa with Isamu Noguchi’s ceramic wall sculpture Skin and Bones and Akari light sculpture in Noguchi’s studio in Kita Kamakura, Japan, c. 1952. Photograph in the Noguchi Museum Archive. ©The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, NY / ARS.

Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan is made possible through lead support from the Terra Foundation for American Art. Generous transportation assistance has been provided by ANA (All Nippon Airways Co., Ltd.). Major support has also been received from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation. The exhibition is also supported, in part, with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council and from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan
Saturday, January 12, 2019 - Sunday, March 24, 2019

Yokohama Museum of Art, Japan

Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan focuses on the consequential friendship between Isamu Noguchi (1904–1988) and Saburo Hasegawa (1906–1957). Until his early death, Hasegawa was among the most renowned contemporary Japanese artists in the U.S., credited with introducing European abstraction to Japan in his role as an active art historian, critic, and art theorist.

The brief yet productive relationship between the two artists was kindled during Noguchi’s visit to Japan in 1950, as together they sought to understand and process the fragmented postwar world and art’s potential role in reassembling it. Noguchi and Hasegawa were each thinking deeply about the relationship between tradition and modernity and between indigenous and foreign influences in postwar art and culture in Japan and in their own work. Together, they undertook a wide-ranging study of traditional Japanese design, culture, and aesthetics. Comprising about 90 works by both Noguchi and Hasegawa, the exhibition will trace influences of their dialogue in their contemporary and subsequent work.

Organized by The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, New York, Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan is curated by Dakin Hart, Senior Curator at The Noguchi Museum, and Mark Dean Johnson, Professor and Gallery Director at San Francisco State University. The exhibition will be on view at the Yokohama Museum of Art, in Japan, from January 12 to March 24, 2019; The Noguchi Museum from May 1 to July 14, 2019; and the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco from September 27 to December 8, 2019.

Read more at yokohama.art.museum.


Changing and Unchanging Things: Noguchi and Hasegawa in Postwar Japan is made possible through lead support from the Terra Foundation for American Art. Generous transportation assistance has been provided by ANA (All Nippon Airways Co., Ltd.). Major support has also been received from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation. The exhibition is also supported, in part, with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council and from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Noguchi for Danh Vo: Counterpoint
Friday, November 16, 2018 - Monday, April 22, 2019

M+ Pavilion, West Kowloon Cultural District, Hong Kong

Noguchi for Danh Vo: Counterpoint presents art and design works by Isamu Noguchi in dialogue with work by Danh Vo (Danish, born Vietnam, 1975). For this exhibition, M+ Museum collaborates closely with Vo—one of the most critically acclaimed artists today—and The Noguchi Museum on the selection and installation of Noguchi’s wide-ranging work. This collaboration offers a new reading and, at the same time, defines a new relationship between the two artists.

Read more at westkowloon.hk.

Photo ©Nick Ash / Danh Vo.

Dimensionism: Modern Art in the Age of Einstein
Wednesday, November 7, 2018 - Sunday, March 3, 2019

Berkeley Art Museum, University of California

In the early twentieth century, inspired by modern science such as Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity, an emerging avant-garde movement sought to expand the “dimensionality” of modern art, engaging with theoretical concepts of time and space to advance bold new forms of creative expression. Dimensionism: Modern Art in the Age of Einstein illuminates the remarkable connections between the scientific and artistic revolutions that shaped some of the most significant works of the time, from Alexander Calder’s kinetic sculptures to Marcel Duchamp’s early experiments with Conceptual art. Others were inspired by emerging research into interstellar and microscopic spaces, while expanding knowledge of quantum mechanics transformed many artists’ views of the world, leading to new approaches to understanding the nature of everyday reality.

Read more at bampfa.org.

Isamu Noguchi, Yellow Landscape, 1943 (partially reconstructed, 1995). Magnesite, wood, string, metal. Photo: Kevin Noble. ©The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, NY / ARS.